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A Systemic Functional Grammar of English: A Simple Introduction

By: David Banks Providing a simple – but not simplistic – introduction to the Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) of English, this book serves as a launching pad for the beginning student and a review for the more seasoned linguist. With an introduction to SFG through lexicogrammar and the...
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NTC’s Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions

“NTC’s Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions,” by lexicographer Richard A. Spears, Ph.D., contains more than 10,000 definitions of terms and expressions that are likely to be heard in movies, on television, in the streets, and on college campuses. In addition, the dictionary provides nearly 20,000 example...
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Elementary Language Practice

In this text, particular focus is given to functional language, with units on areas such as greetings, excuses, directions and descriptions, agreeing and disagreeing. This gives students a wider view of grammar and vocabulary in context in a variety of immediately useful everyday situations. Elementary level grammar clearly...
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Using Talk to Support Writing

by Ros Fisher, Susan J. Jones, Shirley Larkin, Debra Myhill Using Talk to Support Writing presents a new and innovative approach to the teaching of early writing. The authors discuss both theoretical and practical issues around using talk in the classroom to support children as they learn to...
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Have Fun With Vocabulary

Covers 15 useful everyday topics such as food and drink, shopping, transport, the media, jobs, and health and fitness *Detailed teacher’s notes provide information on method, the level of the activity, timing and background *Answer key, scoreboards and suggestions for room plans *Suitable for Elementary to Advanced level...
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Grammars and Grammaticality

by Michael B. Kac At the outset, the goal of generative grammar was the explication of an intuitive concept grammaticality (Chomsky 1957:13). But psychological goals have become primary, referred to as “linguistic competence”, “language faculty”, or, more recently, “I-language”. Kac argues for the validity of the earlier goal...
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